How to Treat an Ankle Sprain

Ankle sprains is an injury that often occurs when the ligaments connecting the bones of the foot and ankle either stretch or tear (partially or completely). This type of injury is often associated with athletes that are involved in side to side motions such as quick changes in direction or speed. People who suffer such an injury usually feel instant discomfort at the level of the ankle and depending on the severity of the injury, associated swelling and/or ankle weakness.

Types of Ankle Sprains

There are 3 different types of ankle sprains which are identified by the nature of the injury alongside which structures are affected. These types include:

– Inversion sprain: often referred to as ‘rolling your ankle’. This is perhaps the most common type of ankle injury and occurs when the foot turns inwards as a results stretching and/or tearing the ligaments located on the outside of the ankle.

– Eversion sprains: occur when the foot turns inwards often causing injury to the ligaments located on the inside of the ankle.

– High ankle sprains: are the least common type of ankle injury but often are the most serious. It can involve either the inversion or eversion type and occurs when the foot is forced upwards or the leg severely twisted with the foot positioned on the ground. The injury can cause damage to a ligament called the syndesmosis, which connects the two leg bones together and can take quite a while to heal if damaged. Read more

Childrens Heel Pain and Sever’s Disease

Pain and discomfort in the younger population is often times associated with body changes and development. A lot of this pain is often dismissed by parents and guardians as ‘growing pains’ that passes as the child develops. Heel pain is particularly common in active kids. Sever’s disease (also known as calcaneal apophysitis) is a commonly occurring condition in the young and active portion of the population. Males are often more prone to developing the condition than females and the symptoms usually arise prior to puberty. Sever’s is often characterised by ongoing episodes of heel pain which are alleviated by rest and exacerbated by periods of weight bearing activity such as school attendance or participating in sports or social activities. Read more

Different Lacing Techniques

Did you know that there are a number of different shoe lace techniques appropriate for each foot type. Here at The Podiatry Centre, we are aware that feet are as unique as the patients we see. So above is a lacing chart  from our good friends at the Athletes Foot showing a number of ways in which your laces can help your shoes better accommodate your foot type.

High Instep/Arch

For patients with a generally high arched foot. They may feel pressure through their instep due to the traditional lacing technique. The Volume Lacing technique aims to reduce pressure from above the top of the instep. Read more

How to treat Shin Splints

What is it ?

Shin splints are common among runners and individuals who participate in any activity which involves running. This overuse injury usually develops gradually over a period of weeks to months but may occur after a single, excessive bout of exercise. Individuals typically complain of pain in one of two locations: the lower inside half of the leg and, less commonly, the upper outside portion of the leg. Shin splints, also known as medial tibial stress syndrome, are an inflammation of the soft tissue surrounding the bone lining of the tibia at the origin of several leg muscles.

What causes it?

Excessive running, improper conditioning programs and overpronation (flattening of the arch) are common causes of shin splints because of the stress they cause to the medial structures of the lower leg. This stress may cause microtears and inflammation in the soft tissue (periosteum) attached to the tibia. Muscle weakness, non-supportive shoes, running hard on surfaces and overtraining can also be contributing factors. Patients will usually notice the pain when they start exercising and it decreases or goes away as they continue to exercise. They will usually tell you the pain is worse after they stop exercising or it will hit them the following morning. If strain continues in this area for an extended period of time, it is possible for microfractures (stress fractures) to form along the tibia. There typically isn’t a sudden break of the bone but usually patients will relate a gradual increase in pain until it becomes quite severe.

Pain in the shin area may be coming from the lumbar sacral spine, a muscle imbalance, uneven leg length or compartment syndrome. Typically, abnormal biomechanics, such as overpronation (excessive flattening of the foot), can cause these posterior shin splints

Running on hard surfaces and a flatfoot condition may be initiating factors as well. However, more often than not, this condition is a simple result of over-training or improper training. Read more

Which Running Shoe to Buy?

It can be a very confusing and over-whelming experience trying to shop for a running shoe. Its great that running shoe companies are offering such a wide range of shoes with technical features, but in-turn this has left the public feeling even more confused as to what shoe they should get. We hear your struggles and understand that you may also not be in expert hands when getting fitted. Hence we have created a shoe table (Updated 2015) that compares different shoe brands. Some may know what they require but others don’t. If you don’t , then see a podiatrist for an expert opinion. Selecting a shoe is not simply about your arch height or shape. It is actually a bit more complicated. Shoes vary in their shape, density, elevation pitch, cushion, and weight. Patients often ask me “What brand do you recommend ?” and I often reply ” Its not about what brand is the best, but what shoe is most suitable for you ?” . Podiatrist will determine the most suitable running shoe for a person by asking the following questions:

– What is the frequency, mileage, speed, surface of you running ?

-What injuries have you incurred in the past ?

-Do you have any current or past foot or leg pain ?

-What shoes are you currently wearing and why ?

-What is the weight and build of your body ?

-Are you using orthotics and why ?

Read more