Running Shoes

Avoid foot problems with our podiatric care advice

From running shoes to work shoes to casual shoes, let us advise you of what shoe is best for you to avoid any kind of foot problems.

About Running Shoes
What’s the best running shoe for your foot type? If you have trouble picking the best running shoes, it may help to learn more about your foot type before you shop for your next pair. Feet come in all shapes and sizes, but their structure tends to get grouped into the following categories.

Common Foot Types

  • Flat Feet – Your foot is flat if you have no visible arch and your footprint is completely visible with no inward curve between the big toe and heel.
  • High Arches – High arches are easy to spot. There is a clear arch between the heel and the ball of the foot. If your footprint has a large curve with a skinny outer edge, or perhaps an actual gap between the ball and the heel, you have a high arch.
  • Neutral Foot Type – A neutral foot type is neither flat-footed or high-arched. Your footprint will have a small inward curve of no more than an inch.
  • Overpronators – Overpronators tend to roll inward from heel strike to take off during every stride. Those who pronate often need more stable running shoes.
  • Supinators – Supinators tend to roll outward from heel strike to take off during every stride and need a flexible, cushioned shoe to absorb road shock while running.

How to Determine Your Foot Type
To learn your foot type you can speak to the podiatrist who will underatake a comprehensive examination of your feet and view the way you run.

Running Shoe Types
There are several different categories of running shoes marketed by the shoe manufacturers. What type you buy often depends upon your preference, history of injuries, foot type and training needs.
1. Motion Control Shoes
These are the most rigid, durable, control-oriented running shoes that limit overpronation. Buy these shoes if you overpronate, you wear orthotics and want a stable shoe, or you have flat feet.
2. Trail Running Shoes
These shoes offer the best traction, with stability and durability. Buy these shoes if you run off-road or in inclement weather and need extra traction, more durable uppers and a thicker soled shoe.
3. Minimal and Barefoot Running Shoes
Some experts believe that cushioned, over-built running shoes actually do more harm than good and recommend minimal shoes or barefoot running. If you want to try this method, start slowly or with a minimal running shoe.
4. Stability Running Shoes
A good blend of cushioning, support and durability. Buy these shoes if you are of average weight and don’t have any severe pronation or supination, but do need support and good durability.
5. Cushioned Shoes
The most cushioned shoes with the least support. Buy these shoes if you underpronate, have a rigid foot (high arch) and don’t need any extra support.
6. Lightweight Training Shoes
The lightest of the training shoes designed for fast-paced training or racing. Buy these shoes if you have no motion-control problems and are a fast, efficient runner.

When to Replace Running Shoes
Plan ahead and buy your next pair of shoes before your old pair wears out. Exercising in worn-out shoes can cause (or contribute to) injuries.
It is recommended that you replace running shoes between 350 to 550 miles depending on your running style, body weight, and the surface on which you run. Lighter runners can get closer to the upper end of the recommendation while heavier runners are harder on shoes and should consider replacement shoes closer to 350 miles.

Running Shoe Buying Tips

  • Shop late in the day — your feet swell during the day.
  • Measure your foot while standing.
  • Try on both shoes with the socks you will wear.
  • Buy for your larger foot (feet are rarely the same exact size).
  • Allow a thumbnail’s width between the shoe and your big toe.
  • Choose shoes that are comfortable immediately. If they hurt in the store, don’t buy them.
  • Look for a moderately priced shoe. Price is not necessarily an indication of quality. Research has shown that moderately priced running shoes work just as well as expensive ones.
  • Make sure the shoe matches your foot type and running style.
  • Wear new shoes around the house before using them on short runs.
  • Don’t do a long run in new shoes. Start out with a short run and stop if you have any hot spots, which are a warning sign that a blister is on the way.
  • Consider having an evaluation by the podiatrist to learn your foot type.

Running

About Running Shoes
What’s the best running shoe for your foot type? If you have trouble picking the best running shoes, it may help to learn more about your foot type before you shop for your next pair. Feet come in all shapes and sizes, but their structure tends to get grouped into the following categories.

Common Foot Types

  • Flat Feet – Your foot is flat if you have no visible arch and your footprint is completely visible with no inward curve between the big toe and heel.
  • High Arches – High arches are easy to spot. There is a clear arch between the heel and the ball of the foot. If your footprint has a large curve with a skinny outer edge, or perhaps an actual gap between the ball and the heel, you have a high arch.
  • Neutral Foot Type – A neutral foot type is neither flat-footed or high-arched. Your footprint will have a small inward curve of no more than an inch.
  • Overpronators – Overpronators tend to roll inward from heel strike to take off during every stride. Those who pronate often need more stable running shoes.
  • Supinators – Supinators tend to roll outward from heel strike to take off during every stride and need a flexible, cushioned shoe to absorb road shock while running.

How to Determine Your Foot Type
To learn your foot type you can speak to the podiatrist who will underatake a comprehensive examination of your feet and view the way you run.

Running Shoe Types
There are several different categories of running shoes marketed by the shoe manufacturers. What type you buy often depends upon your preference, history of injuries, foot type and training needs.
1. Motion Control Shoes
These are the most rigid, durable, control-oriented running shoes that limit overpronation. Buy these shoes if you overpronate, you wear orthotics and want a stable shoe, or you have flat feet.
2. Trail Running Shoes
These shoes offer the best traction, with stability and durability. Buy these shoes if you run off-road or in inclement weather and need extra traction, more durable uppers and a thicker soled shoe.
3. Minimal and Barefoot Running Shoes
Some experts believe that cushioned, over-built running shoes actually do more harm than good and recommend minimal shoes or barefoot running. If you want to try this method, start slowly or with a minimal running shoe.
4. Stability Running Shoes
A good blend of cushioning, support and durability. Buy these shoes if you are of average weight and don’t have any severe pronation or supination, but do need support and good durability.
5. Cushioned Shoes
The most cushioned shoes with the least support. Buy these shoes if you underpronate, have a rigid foot (high arch) and don’t need any extra support.
6. Lightweight Training Shoes
The lightest of the training shoes designed for fast-paced training or racing. Buy these shoes if you have no motion-control problems and are a fast, efficient runner.

When to Replace Running Shoes
Plan ahead and buy your next pair of shoes before your old pair wears out. Exercising in worn-out shoes can cause (or contribute to) injuries.
It is recommended that you replace running shoes between 350 to 550 miles depending on your running style, body weight, and the surface on which you run. Lighter runners can get closer to the upper end of the recommendation while heavier runners are harder on shoes and should consider replacement shoes closer to 350 miles.

Running Shoe Buying Tips

  • Shop late in the day — your feet swell during the day.
  • Measure your foot while standing.
  • Try on both shoes with the socks you will wear.
  • Buy for your larger foot (feet are rarely the same exact size).
  • Allow a thumbnail’s width between the shoe and your big toe.
  • Choose shoes that are comfortable immediately. If they hurt in the store, don’t buy them.
  • Look for a moderately priced shoe. Price is not necessarily an indication of quality. Research has shown that moderately priced running shoes work just as well as expensive ones.
  • Make sure the shoe matches your foot type and running style.
  • Wear new shoes around the house before using them on short runs.
  • Don’t do a long run in new shoes. Start out with a short run and stop if you have any hot spots, which are a warning sign that a blister is on the way.
  • Consider having an evaluation by the podiatrist to learn your foot type.

Children

About children’s shoes
In the early infant stages, a baby needs only booties or socks for warmth and protection. As the infant grows and begins to walk upright, bare feet are appropriate indoors as they allow the child to touch and feel the ground, developing proper sensory input; strengthen their intrinsic muscles (small, deep muscles of the foot); and develop their arches. To prevent injury, shoes should be worn outside of the house at all times.

When purchasing your child’s first shoes:

  • Consider a store that specializes in shoes for growing feet. In the early years, a child’s foot may be wide through the arch, so proper fitting in the width is important.
  • A sneaker or soft soled shoe is a good choice. A typical, low-cut sneaker allows the child to develop the ligaments and muscles around the ankle that are necessary for developing good balance and stabilization.
  • The toe box should be roomy and wide enough for the toes to wiggle. A finger’s breadth of extra length will usually allow for about 3-to-6 months of growth, depending on the child’s age and growth rate.

Your child’s foot may grow faster than you expect at different ages and stages, so it is important to check the fit of your child’s shoes regularly. If the shoes become difficult to place on the foot, and/or the child consistently wants their shoes off, it may mean that the shoes have become too small.
If you are concerned that the current footwear is not appropriate for your child, speak to the podiatrist for advise on where to shop and what to buy. It is critical that children have the right shoes for their feet. Just like adult footwear needs to be suited to the persons foot shape, a child also requires the right fit for them

Men

About Men’s Shoes

Mens footwear is becoming ever so stylish and slimmer. So it is common to have incorrectly fitted mens shoes, particularly business shoes that have the long narrow toe box and slim sole. These shoes can cause excessive pressure on the toes and also cause more pressure on the sole of the foot due to insufficient padding.

Depending on the surface at work or mode of transport to work, it is important to have the right shoe to suit the foot and type of work.
Look for shoes that:

  • Have adequate space in the toe box. A deep square toe box is ideal.
  • Thick cushioned sole protects the foot from ground pressure.
  • A leather upper and interior is more friendly to the skin on the foot.
  • A secure deep heel cup helps to support the foot and prevent secondary heel pain.

Your shoe may be the cause of your current pain. So speak to the podiatrist about it for more tailored advise on what shoes is best for you.

Orthopaedic

About Orthopaedic shoes

Orthopaedic shoes can refer to custom made footwear or ready made footwear. Their style and manufacture is made with the intention of providing the best fit possible to suit the patients foot shape and deformities. Some people, particularly the elderly, have feet that have become misshapen over the years due to arthritis, trauma, and other medical conditions. So it is very hard to find a shoe in a retail shop that comfortably fits. Orthopaedic shoes are designed with maximum interior shoe space, good thick sole, and firm heel counters to ensure they accommodate the feet without any problems.

If you have diabetes, poor circulation, foot deformities, painful arthritis, or any other medical problem that has changed your feet, you may want to speak to the podiatrist about how orthopaedic shoes can make your walking better.

There are certain footwear shops that make orthopaedic shoes, and we can refer you on to the most suitable place that stocks them.

If you hold a veterans card, you may be eligible to have a pair of orthopaedic shoes under the program. Speak to the podiatrist for more information.

Women

Women’s Shoes

Over time, wearing high heels with a narrow toe box can cause the foot to take the shape of the shoe and result in deformities like hammer toes and corns.

There are a variety of women’s shoes on the market ranging from comfortable, casual everyday shoes, to more formal shoes with four-inch heels. An ideal choice is a shoe that has a square or wide toe box, with a heel that is lower than two inches high.

Higher heeled, pointed shoes can cause bunions, knee pain, and lower back pain. In addition, high-heeled shoes place tremendous pressure on the fat pad under the ball of the foot (forefoot). The higher the heel, the greater the pressure and the likelihood for injury. If a high-heeled shoe has a pointed toe, it creates even more pressure in the forefoot.
If you prefer to wear higher heels, look for shoes with a platform under the toe box, which will decrease the overall stress on the foot. If you are purchasing a lower-heeled shoe, make sure that the heel is secure and that there is ample room in the toe box. Ballerina flats should have elastic along the top sides of the shoe so that they grip onto your foot better and not cut across your big toe joint.